Another King James Bible Believer

JEHOVAH, Yahweh, Ehyeh, Yave, Yahawah, YaHuWaH, Yahovah, Iabe, Jahveh, Yahu or Yahoo?

The Significance of the Name JEHOVAH



And - 


Jeshua, Yeshua, Yeshuah, Yehshua, Yehshuah, YESHUA, YESHUAH, YEHSHUA, YEHSHUAH, Yeshouah, Y'shua, Y'shuah, Jeshu, Yeshu, Yehoshua, Yehoshuah, YHVHShua, YHVHShuah, Yhvhshua, Yhwhshua, YHWHShua, YHWHShuah, Yhvhshuah, Yahwshua,  Yhwhshuah, Yahvehshua, Yahwehshua, Yahvehshuah, Yahwehshuah, Jahshua, Jahshuah, Jashua, Jashuah, Jahoshua, Jahoshuah, Jehoshua, Jehoshuah, Yashua, Yashuah, Yahshua, Yahshuah, YAHSHUA, YAHSHUAH, YASHUA, YASHUAH, Yahushua, Yahushuah, Yahoshua, Yahoshuah, Yaohushua, YAOHUSHUA, Yaohushuah, Iahoshua, Iahoshuah, Iahushua, or Iahushuah? In English it's Jesus which is yeshua in Hebrew.

 

In regards to JEHOVAH, a remarkable thing about the King James Bible is that the name is found exactly 7 times - Genesis 22:14; Exodus 6:3, 17:15; Judges 6:24; Psalm 83:18; Isaiah 12:2 and 26:4.

 

Seven is the number of spiritual perfection. This Hebrew word (There are actually two variants of this Hebrew word; one is # 3068 Jehovah and the variant #3069 Jehovih.) is translated three different ways by the KJB. As LORD, GOD, and JEHOVAH.  

 

The NASB only translates this word in two ways--as LORD, and GOD.  The NKJV has either LORD, GOD or inconsistently as YAH.  God is a triune God, and the KJB has translated it in three ways - LORD, GOD and JEHOVAH. The one time the word JAH occurs in the KJB, but this is a different but related Hebrew word #3060 Jah.  God is the creator, Lord is the sovereign ruler of His creation, and JEHOVAH is the personal name of the Redeemer God, who redeems His people.

 

The first time JEHOVAH appears is in Genesis 22:14 when Abraham is stopped from offering up his son Isaac. All of this of course is a type of the Father offering up His Son. "And Abraham called the name of the place JEHOVAH-jireh: as it is said to this day, In the mount of the LORD it shall be seen".

 

God will provide, JEHOVAH JIREH.

 

The second time the name appears (and Christ is the second person of the trinity) is in the second book of Exodus, which is the book of redemption. In Exodus 6:3-6 God appears to Moses and here the name is used again in connection with REDEMPTION. "And I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, by the name of God Almighty, but by my name JEHOVAH was I not known to them."  

 

The name of God is not just the physical letters "Jehovah" or "Lord" or "God", but has to do with his character. The "name" of God is who he is. See Exodus 34;5-7 where the LORD proclaims "the name of the LORD" to Moses.

 

Likewise the second time the word 'redeem' occurs in the Bible is found right here in this context. Verse 6 - "And I will redeem you with a stretched out arm, and with great judgments." So JEHOVAH is the personal name of the Redeemer God.

 

The word JEHOVAH, as the personal name of God, is found not only in the KJB, but also in Tyndale 1534, the Great Bible (Cranmer) of 1540, Matthew's Bible 1549, Bishop's Bible 1568, the Geneva Bible 1599, the Bill Bible 1671, Webster's translation 1833, The Longman Version 1841, The Boothroyd Bible 1853, The Wellbeloved Scriptures 1862, The Smith Bible 1876, The Revised English Bible 1877, The Sharpe Bible 1883, the Revised Version 1885, Darby's translation 1890, Young's 'literal' 1898 - "as to My name Jehovah, I have not been known to them", the American Standard Version 1901, The Ancient Hebrew Bible 1907, The Modern Reader's Bible 1907, The Improved Bible 1913, the 1936 Jewish translation (Hebrew Publishing Company, New York), Lamsa's 1936 translation of the Syriac Peshitta, The Fenton Bible 1966, the New Berkeley Version 1969, the New English Bible 1970, the KJV 21st Century 1994, The Living Bible 1971- "Jehovah provides", the Third Millennium Bible 1998, God's First Truth 1999 - "by my name JEHOVAH", the Heritage Bible 2003, The Revised Geneva Bible 2005, the Torah Transliteration Scriptures 2008, the Bond Slave Version 2009, Holy Scriptures VW Edition 2010 by Paul Becker, the Biblos Interlinear Bible 2011, the BRG Bible 2012 and the Far Above All Translation 2014 - "Abraham called that place JEHOVAH-jireh"

 

 

 

Among foreign language Bible that have JEHOVAH are the Spanish Cipriano de Valera Bible of 1602 - "Y yo aparecí a Abraham, a Isaac y a Jacob bajo el nombre de Dios Todopoderoso, mas en mi nombre JEHOVÁ no me di a conocer a ellos." (Exodus 6:3), the Spanish Reina Valera  1865, 1909, 1960 and 1995, La Versión Moderna 1929, the 2004 Reina Valera Gómez - "pues por mi nombre JEHOVÁ yo no era conocido de ellos.", the Portuguese Almeida Bibles and the Portuguese O Livro 2000 - "mas pelo meu nome JEOVA, não lhes fui conhecido.", the Hungarian Karoli Bible 1590 - "de az én Jehova", the Polish Biblia Gdanska - "ale w imieniu mojem, JEHOWA, nie jestem poznany od nich.", the Tagalog Ang Dating Biblia 1905 - "ng aking pangalang JEHOVA", the Malagasy Bible 1865 - "hoe JEHOVAH tsy mbola", the Xuaát EÂ-díp-toâ Vietnamese Bible 1934 - "ta là GIE-HO-VA", the German Elberfelder 1871 and the German Tafelbibel 1911 - "aber mit meinem Namen JEHOVA".

 

This name has disappeared from versions like the RSV, NKJV, NIV, NASB, and ESV.

 

Some people tell us the name of God should be something like YAHWEH, Yud-Heh-Vav-Heh, Jahweh or Yaweh, rather than JEHOVAH. The problem with this argument is that there are a multitude of Biblical personal names that all have JEHOVAH as part of the name. We read in all English versions that I am aware of names such as JEHOiakim, JEHiah, JEHOshaphat, JEHOhanan, JEHOiachin, JEHOiada, JEHOram and JEHOshua. I have yet to see one of these English bibles come out yet spelling these as Yahhosaphat, Yahoiakim, Yahoiada etc.

 

Is God’s Name JEHOVAH or Yahweh?  A 10 minute UTube presentation showing that it is JEHOVAH and why.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d5wW-VVHPE4 



Ridiculous KJV Bible Corrections


Who is Yahweh?  by John Hinton, Ph.D.  Harvard.


 

http://av1611.com/kjbp/ridiculous-kjv-bible-corrections/Yahweh-Jehova-YHVH.html


Jehovah or Yahweh?

 


Scott Jones writes: “Jehovah (pronounced /dʒɨˈhoʊvə/) is an English reading of יְהֹוָה, the most frequent form of the Tetragrammaton יהוה, the name of God in the Hebrew Bible. It is a direct phonetic transliteration based on the Hebrew Bible text with vowel points handed down by the Masoretes. Jehovah is the English rendition of the Hebrew Yahovah. Many scholars use the name Yahweh over Jehovah claiming that it is closer to the original. Many names in the bible use 'Jeho' in them, proving that the Hebrews used the name Jehovah and not Yahweh.

The name Jehovah is translated into the King James Bible as the LORD, in capitals. The name Jehovee is GOD, in capitals. Elohim is God, and Adonai is Lord.”

 

 

 

In the Holman Christian Standard Bible of 2003, the whole divine pattern is messed up. The Holman translates this single word in four different ways - LORD, GOD, Yah, and Yahweh. Yah occurs twice and Yahweh some 72 times, but they also translate it as LORD and as GOD, all in a shotgun pattern.

 

Another significant point about the KJB is found in Psalm 68:4 "Sing unto God, sing praises to his name: extol him that rideth upon the heavens by his name JAH, and rejoice before him."

 

This word JAH is found only once in the entire Bible. It is found in Psalm 68:4 "...extol him that rideth upon the heavens by his name JAH, and rejoice before him."  


Strong's tells us that this word # 3050 is "a contraction for 3068 (the word translated in the KJB and many others as JEHOVAH, LORD and GOD) and means the same. JAH, the sacred name: JAH, the Lord, most vehement."


It is one word composed of three letters. Thus representing the triune God. And it is the eighth time total that this personal name occurs. What is the significance of the number 8? Eight is the number of a new beginning. Seven days in a week, 8 is a new beginning. Also the males were circumcised on the eighth day, to signify a new covenant relationship with God.

 

In Leviticus 25:22 we see the land was to rest the seventh year and they were to sow a new crop in the eighth year. Noah was the eighth person saved during the flood when God began again to repopulate the earth. Even in Revelation 17:11 when the Beast begins his reign of the Antichrist, he is the eighth.

 

Seven is the number of spiritual perfection and in the KJB the name JEHOVAH is found 7 times. Three in one is the Trinity and we have the name JAH found only once. Eight is the number of a new beginning, and it is through the redeeming grace of JEHOVAH that we are made new creatures in Christ and begin a new life in Him.

 

In addition to this, another interesting thing found only in the King James Bible is the name JEHOVAH in capital letters is found four times in the Old Testament - Exodus 6:3; Psalms 83:18; Isaiah 12: 2 and 26:4. Likewise the name JESUS standing in capital letters all by itself and not in a longer phrase is found only four times in the New Testament - Matthew 1:21, 25; Luke 1:31 and 2:21.  Four is the number of the earth and JEHOVAH God Himself has come to this earth to save His people from their sins.

 

The name of JESUS in capital letters is found in two phrases "And set up over his head his accusation written, THIS IS JESUS THE KING OF THE JEWS." (Matthew 27:37) and in John 19:19 "And Pilate wrote a title, and put it on the cross. And the writing was, JESUS OF NAZARETH THE KING OF THE JEWS." This brings the total to six and six is the number of man.  Thus Jehovah God our Redeemer (7) came to earth (4) as a man (6).

 

So, only in the King James Bible do we have these precious truths revealed. This is just one of the many marks of God on this Book that shows it is indeed His inspired word in the English language.

 

Some people ask: "Well, why doesn't the King James Bible always use the word JEHOVAH when it occurs in the Hebrew texts?"  I think there are at least a couple of reasons for this and there may well be more.  One reason is the fact that in both the King James Bible and in the Hebrew Scriptures themselves the words for Jehovah, translated in many Bibles as LORD (#3068 Jehovah) in capital letters and sometimes as GOD in capital letters are interchangeable with the word for God (#430 el-o-heem).  There are many whole sections of Scripture found in Samuel, Kings, Chronicles and Psalms that relate the same events, yet in one the Hebrew text uses the word Jehovah and in the other it uses the word eloheem.  Thus it seems quite evident that God Himself uses these words interchangeably. 

 

Here is one section of Scripture out of the many that do this.  The same events are recorded in 2 Samuel 5:17 - 25 and in 1 Chronicles 14:8-17, yet we see the word Jehovah being used in 2 Samuel while Eloheem is used in 1 Chronicles, and at the same time Jehovah is used in both accounts.  

 

2 Samuel 5:19 says: "And David inquired of the LORD" (Jehovah) but in 1 Chron. 14:10 the same verse reads: "And David enquired of God".  

 

In 2 Samuel 5:20 "and David smote them there, and said, The LORD hath broken forth upon mine enemies" yet in 1 Chron. 14:10 "The David said, God hath broken in upon mine enemies"; in 2 Samuel 5:23 "And when David inquired of the LORD" yet in 1 Chron.14:14 "Therefore David enquired again of God"; in 2 Samuel 5:24 "for then shall the LORD go out before thee" but in 1 Chron. 14:15 "for God is gone forth before thee" and in 2 Samuel 5:25 "And David did so as the LORD had commanded him" while 1 Chron. 14:16 has: "David therefore did as God commanded him."

 

Though the 1 Chronicles 14 passages often use "God" instead of "the LORD" yet we see "the LORD" being used in verses 14:10 and 17.

 

 

 

This same interchangeability of the names Jehovah and Elohim is seen when comparing 2 Samuel chapter 6 with 1 Chronicles 13 where the same events and quotes are given, but one section uses the word Jehovah and the other one Elohim.  In 2 Samuel 6:5 we reads that "And David and all the house of Israel played before THE LORD". Yet the exact same event is recorded in 1 Chronicles 13:8 as "And David and all Israel played before GOD (God - Elohim)".  

 

Then in 2 Samuel 6:9, after God struck down Uzzah because he had touched the ark of God, we read: "And David was afraid of THE LORD (Jehovah) that day, and said, How shall the ark of THE LORD (Jehovah) come to me?"  

 

Yet this same quote is given in 1 Chronicles 13:12 as "And David was afraid of GOD (God - Elohim) that day, saying, How shall I bring the ark of GOD (God - Elohim) home to me?"

 

And in 2 Samuel 6:11 we read: "And the ark of THE LORD (Jehovah) continued in the house of Obededom the Gittite three months"

 

Yet this very same event is recorded in 1 Chronicles 13:14 as "And the ark of GOD (God - Elohim) remained with the family of Obededom in his house three months."

 

Another fairly well know pair of Psalms show how the words LORD (Jehovah) and God are used interchangeably.  These are two very similar Psalms and they are quoted from in Romans chapter Three. Psalms 14:2 says "The LORD (Jehovah) looked down from heaven upon the children of men, to see if there were any that did understand and seek God." Yet the same words repeated in Psalm 53:2 says "GOD (Elohiym) looked down from heaven upon the children of men, to see if there were any that did understand, that did seek God."  

 

Again we see this same pattern of the interchangeability of LORD (Jehovah) with Lord (Adonay) in Genesis chapter 18 where the LORD (Jehovah) speaks to Abraham and yet Abraham calls him Lord (Adonay).  "And the LORD (Jehovah) said, If I find in Sodom fifty righteous within the city, then I will spare all the place for their sakes.  And Abraham answered and said, Behold now, I have taken upon me to speak unto the Lord (Adonay), which am but dust and ashes."  Genesis 18:26-27.  See also verses 30, 31, 32 where Abraham calls God "the Lord" (Adonay) and God again refers to Himself as LORD (Jehovah) in verse 33. The terms are interchangeable.

 

Whenever you see either LORD or GOD in capital letters in the King James Bible, the underlying Hebrew word is Jehovah, and when either eloheem or adonai are used, then the KJB puts these as either God or Lord with small letters following the capital G or L. 

 

Another reason the King James Bible (and most others as well) does not always use the word Jehovah but usually translates it as either the LORD or GOD is that when the Old Testament is quoted in the New Testament, the Greek translation of this Hebrew word becomes either God or the Lord (theos or kurios) in the New Testament quotes.

 

Here is just one of many such examples. In Deuteronomy 8:3 we read: "...that he might make thee know that man doth not live by bread only, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of the LORD (Jehovah) doth man live."  And yet when this verse is quoted by Jesus in the New Testament it says: "It is written, Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of GOD." (Theos).

 

 

 

So apparently it was not that big a deal with God Himself that His personal name always be translated strictly as Jehovah but that the inspired words of both "God"  and "the Lord" are entirely accurate and acceptable to God Himself.  Another possible reason is that since Jehovah is God's personal name and He is my Father, so in like manner we do not go around calling our earthly father by his personal name (unless we are talking about him to another) but we generally call him Dad, Sir or Father.  What an amazing Bible we have!

 

Will Kinney

 

 Return to Articles -  http://brandplucked.webs.com/kjbarticles.htm

 

 

 

 

 

Supporting Articles for Jehovah, LORD and GOD as all being correct.

 

“LORD" or "Jehovah/YHWH" in Genesis 2:4 et al.?  from KJV Today

 

http://www.kjvtoday.com/home/lord-or-jehovahyhwh-in-genesis-24

 

"These are the generations of the heavens and of the earth when they were created, in the day that the LORD God made the earth and the heavens," (Genesis 2:4, KJV)

The KJV, as with most other translations, uses "LORD" (in all capital letters) to refer to the covenant name of God.  

 

The Hebrew word is "יהוה" (YHWH), which is called the Tetragrammaton.  The Jews refrained from pronouncing this sacred name lest they accidentally take God's name in vain.  These Jews adopted the practice of reading the Tetragrammaton as "Adonai", which is the Hebrew word for "Lord". 

 

 While some critics claim that this was just a peculiar practice of Judaism, Jesus himself adopted this practice.  Whenever Jesus quoted Old Testament passages that have the Tetragrammaton, he translated the Hebrew "יהוה (YHWH)" as "kurios," which is the Greek word for "Lord." Thus Jesus used either an Aramaic or Greek word for "Lord" to translate "יהוה."

 

 At the very least, the New Testament writers used "kurios" to refer to the Tetragrammaton.  Here are some examples:

 

In Matthew 4:7, Jesus quoted Deuteronomy 6:16. The Hebrew in Deuteronomy 6:16 says, "יהוה אלהיכם (YHWH elohei-chem)." The Greek translation of this in Matthew 4:7 is "κυριον τον θεον σου (kurion ton theon sou)."

 

In Matthew 21:42, Jesus quoted Psalm 118:22-23. The Hebrew in Psalm 118:23 says, "יהוה (YHWH)." The Greek translation of this in Matthew 21:42 is "κυριου (kuriou)."

 

In Luke 20:42, Jesus quoted Psalm 110:1. The Hebrew of Psalm 110:1 says, "יהוה לאדני (YHWH l'adoni)." The Greek translation of this in Luke 20:42 is "ο κυριος τω κυριω μου (ho kurios to kurio mou)."

 

 


The True Names of God, by Craig Kusmierski, where he deals with the letter “J” as well.


https://www.facebook.com/notes/craig-kusmierski/the-true-names-of-god/351679154868344?hc_location=ufi

 

 

 Good article on The True Names of God by brother Craig Kusmierski that deals with the English letter “J” issue and shows why JEHOVAH in English is the true name of God and not this Yahweh thingy.


https://www.facebook.com/notes/craig-kusmierski/the-true-names-of-god/351679154868344?hc_location=ufi

 

  

 

Really good, short article  on Jehovah or Yahweh.

 

http://www.learnthebible.org/jehovah-or-yahweh.html

 



Notes from the Internet -


Posted by missionary and King James Bible believer Peter Heisey -



The vowels of the Tetragrammaton, that is, Yehowah or Jehovah (Exodus 6:3; Psalm 83:18; Isaiah 12:2; 26:4) are not a late addition, but represent the original and true pronunciation of the profoundly significant Divine Name. The commonly repeated modern idea that the pronunciation Jehovah is a late and incorrect invention, while Yahweh is the true pronunciation of the Name, is false. No known Hebrew manuscript on earth contains the vocalization Yahweh. On the other hand, the form Jehovah is found in a variety of locations in the oldest Hebrew copies, such as the Aleppo codex and a variety of Biblical fragments dated between 700 and 900, as well as being the universal pointing in the Old Testament Textus Receptus. Jewish scholars such as Maimonides (1138-1204) affirmed that the Tetragrammaton was pronounced according to its letters as YeHoWaH. 


Were, as the common modern notion affirms, the vowels of the Divine Name simply lifted from Adonai, the yod of the Tetragram would have a hateph pathach underneath it, not a shewa. Furthermore, all the names in Scripture that begin with portions of the Tetragrammaton possess the vowels of Jehovah, not of Yahweh. 


If one wanted to maintain that the vocalization of God’s Name had been corrupted in Scripture, contrary to His declarations that nothing of the kind would happen (Psalm 12:6-7; Matthew 5:18), one would also need to maintain that every name in the Bible that begins with part of the Tetragrammaton has also been corrupted. Jehoadah would really be something like Yahwadah; Jehoahaz would be Yahwahaz; Jehoash would be Yahwahash, and so on. 


Furthermore, no theophoric names anywhere in Scripture end with an eh, the expected ending were the Name pronounced Yahweh. Similarly, the word Hallelujah and the Greek Alleluia validate the ah at the end of the Divine Name. 


Furthermore, the Mishna states that the Name was pronounced as it was written, that is, as Jehovah.This pronunciation is also consistent with Talmudic evidence. 


The plain facts concerning what the vowels on the Name actually are in the Hebrew text, other theophoric names, the Mishna, and a variety of other evidences demonstrate that the Tetragrammaton is correctly pronounced Jehovah.


In contrast to the strong evidence in favor of the pronunciation Jehovah, very little favors the pronunciation Yahweh. Since this latter pronunciation is not favored by any evidence in the Hebrew of the Bible, nor in other ancient Jewish documents, its advocates must look outside of Scripture and Jewish texts for evidence in its favor. This they find in the late patristic writers Theodoret and Epiphanius, who give Iabe as the pronunciation of the Tetragrammaton, although the former distinguishes this vocalization as the pronunciation of the Samaritans. 


These statements constitute the most substantive and strongest argument in favor of the pronunciation Yahweh. Also, papyri involving pagan magic, and in which every possible and impossible designation of deities, Greek, Egyptian and Semitic, is found in profuse variety, contain invocations that sound like the word Yahweh. 


To use the speculations of two patristic writers—one of whom even specifies that Yahweh was a Samaritan pronunciation, and that the Jews used something else—to overthrow the vocalization of the Name in the OT Textus Receptus, Jehovah, is entirely unjustifiable. 


To use a name found in some pagan papyri that are invoking numberless idols and demons to reject Jehovah is even worse. 


The evidence for the pronunciation Yahweh is very poor, and totally insufficient to overthrow the powerful and numerous evidences in favor of the pronunciation Jehovah.


Thus, it is evident that Jehovah is the correct pronunciation of the Name of God. Jehovah has not allowed the pronunciation of His Name to be lost.


The error that Yahweh is the correct pronunciation of the Divine Name is connected to the error that only the consonants of the Hebrew text are inspired, while the vowels were invented by a class of Jewish scribes around the tenth century A. D. On the contrary, Scripture and solid evidence demonstrates that the words of the Hebrew text—including the vowels—are inspired and were recorded by the Biblical authors. Extensive evidence for the inspiration of the Hebrew vowels is provided in my essay “Evidences for the Inspiration of the Hebrew Vowel Points” in the Bibliology section of my website ( react-text: 1324 http://faithsaves.net/bibliology/ /react-text ). The evidence for the pronunciation Jehovah above is a summary of Appendix 1 of the same essay on my website, where extensive documentation and a more detailed discussion is provided. The question is also discussed in lecture #1 of my class on Trinitarianism ( react-text: 1327 http://faithsaves.net/trinitarianism/ /react-text ). My essay "The Debate over the Inspiration of the Hebrew Vowel Points" should also be mentioned.


Furthermore, the fact that Jehovah is the correct pronunciation of the Tetragrammaton is one of a number of strong reasons to reject the critical Hebrew text (the Leningrad MS) underlying the generality of modern English Bible versions. While the Old Testament Received Text that underlies the Authorized Version properly and fully vocalizes the Tetragrammaton, the Hebrew critical text corrupts the Divine Name by omitting one of its vowels in thousands of passages. Other serious corruptions are also present in the Leningrad MS.


Finally, the King James Bible is found to be correct in its vocalization of the Divine Name as Jehovah, while it properly omits the modern fictitious pronunciation Yahweh. God’s people should do the same, and call, not on Yahweh, but on the Triune Jehovah.


The previous report by Thomas Ross is re-published by permission of the author.




Notes from the Internet -

Posted by missionary and King James Bible believer Peter Heisey -


The vowels of the Tetragrammaton, that is, Yehowah or Jehovah (Exodus 6:3; Psalm 83:18; Isaiah 12:2; 26:4) are not a late addition, but represent the original and true pronunciation of the profoundly significant Divine Name. The commonly repeated modern idea that the pronunciation Jehovah is a late and incorrect invention, while Yahweh is the true pronunciation of the Name, is false. No known Hebrew manuscript on earth contains the vocalization Yahweh. On the other hand, the form Jehovah is found in a variety of locations in the oldest Hebrew copies, such as the Aleppo codex and a variety of Biblical fragments dated between 700 and 900, as well as being the universal pointing in the Old Testament Textus Receptus. Jewish scholars such as Maimonides (1138-1204) affirmed that the Tetragrammaton was pronounced according to its letters as YeHoWaH.

Were, as the common modern notion affirms, the vowels of the Divine Name simply lifted from Adonai, the yod of the Tetragram would have a hateph pathach underneath it, not a shewa. Furthermore, all the names in Scripture that begin with portions of the Tetragrammaton possess the vowels of Jehovah, not of Yahweh.

If one wanted to maintain that the vocalization of God’s Name had been corrupted in Scripture, contrary to His declarations that nothing of the kind would happen (Psalm 12:6-7; Matthew 5:18), one would also need to maintain that every name in the Bible that begins with part of the Tetragrammaton has also been corrupted. Jehoadah would really be something like Yahwadah; Jehoahaz would be Yahwahaz; Jehoash would be Yahwahash, and so on.

Furthermore, no theophoric names anywhere in Scripture end with an eh, the expected ending were the Name pronounced Yahweh. Similarly, the word Hallelujah and the Greek Alleluia validate the ah at the end of the Divine Name.

Furthermore, the Mishna states that the Name was pronounced as it was written, that is, as Jehovah.This pronunciation is also consistent with Talmudic evidence.

The plain facts concerning what the vowels on the Name actually are in the Hebrew text, other theophoric names, the Mishna, and a variety of other evidences demonstrate that the Tetragrammaton is correctly pronounced Jehovah.

In contrast to the strong evidence in favor of the pronunciation Jehovah, very little favors the pronunciation Yahweh. Since this latter pronunciation is not favored by any evidence in the Hebrew of the Bible, nor in other ancient Jewish documents, its advocates must look outside of Scripture and Jewish texts for evidence in its favor. This they find in the late patristic writers Theodoret and Epiphanius, who give Iabe as the pronunciation of the Tetragrammaton, although the former distinguishes this vocalization as the pronunciation of the Samaritans.

These statements constitute the most substantive and strongest argument in favor of the pronunciation Yahweh. Also, papyri involving pagan magic, and in which every possible and impossible designation of deities, Greek, Egyptian and Semitic, is found in profuse variety, contain invocations that sound like the word Yahweh.

To use the speculations of two patristic writers—one of whom even specifies that Yahweh was a Samaritan pronunciation, and that the Jews used something else—to overthrow the vocalization of the Name in the OT Textus Receptus, Jehovah, is entirely unjustifiable.

To use a name found in some pagan papyri that are invoking numberless idols and demons to reject Jehovah is even worse.

The evidence for the pronunciation Yahweh is very poor, and totally insufficient to overthrow the powerful and numerous evidences in favor of the pronunciation Jehovah.

Thus, it is evident that Jehovah is the correct pronunciation of the Name of God. Jehovah has not allowed the pronunciation of His Name to be lost.

The error that Yahweh is the correct pronunciation of the Divine Name is connected to the error that only the consonants of the Hebrew text are inspired, while the vowels were invented by a class of Jewish scribes around the tenth century A. D. On the contrary, Scripture and solid evidence demonstrates that the words of the Hebrew text—including the vowels—are inspired and were recorded by the Biblical authors. Extensive evidence for the inspiration of the Hebrew vowels is provided in my essay “Evidences for the Inspiration of the Hebrew Vowel Points” in the Bibliology section of my website ( react-text: 1324 http://faithsaves.net/bibliology/ /react-text ). The evidence for the pronunciation Jehovah above is a summary of Appendix 1 of the same essay on my website, where extensive documentation and a more detailed discussion is provided. The question is also discussed in lecture #1 of my class on Trinitarianism ( react-text: 1327 http://faithsaves.net/trinitarianism/ /react-text ). My essay "The Debate over the Inspiration of the Hebrew Vowel Points" should also be mentioned.

Furthermore, the fact that Jehovah is the correct pronunciation of the Tetragrammaton is one of a number of strong reasons to reject the critical Hebrew text (the Leningrad MS) underlying the generality of modern English Bible versions. While the Old Testament Received Text that underlies the Authorized Version properly and fully vocalizes the Tetragrammaton, the Hebrew critical text corrupts the Divine Name by omitting one of its vowels in thousands of passages. Other serious corruptions are also present in the Leningrad MS.

Finally, the King James Bible is found to be correct in its vocalization of the Divine Name as Jehovah, while it properly omits the modern fictitious pronunciation Yahweh. God’s people should do the same, and call, not on Yahweh, but on the Triune Jehovah.

The previous report by Thomas Ross is re-published by permission of the author.