Another King James Bible Believer

Damned and Damnation in the King James Bible


Damned and Damnation, Condemn and Condemnation


These words have two primary meanings each, both in English and in Greek.


 The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition 2000.


Damn
1. To pronounce an adverse judgment upon. See synonyms at condemn. 2. To bring about the failure of; ruin. 3. To condemn as harmful, illegal, or immoral: a cleric who damned gambling and strong drink. 4. To condemn to everlasting punishment or a similar fate; doom. 5. To swear at. Intransitive verb: To swear; curse.


 Webster's 1828 dictionary


Damn
1. To sentence to eternal torments in a future state; to punish in hell. 2. To condemn; to decide to be wrong or worthy of punishment; to censure; to reprobate. He that doubteth is damned if he eat. Rom xiv 3. To condemn; to explode; to decide to be bad, mean, or displeasing, be hissing or any mark of disapprobation; as, to damn a play, or a mean author. 4. A word used in profaneness; a term of execration.


Condemn and Condemnation


The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition.  2000.
Condemn


1. To express strong disapproval of: condemned the needless waste of food. 2. To pronounce judgment against; sentence: condemned the felons to prison. 3. To judge or declare to be unfit for use or consumption, usually by official order: condemn an old building. 4. To lend credence to or provide evidence for an adverse judgment against: were condemned by their actions. 5. Law To appropriate (property) for public use. ETYMOLOGY: Middle English condemnen, from Old French condemner, from Latin condemnre : com-, intensive pref.; see com– + damnre, to sentence (from damnum, penalty).


Webster's 1828 Dictionary


Condemn
1. To pronounce to be utterly wrong; to utter a sentence of disapprobation against; to censure; to blame. But the word often expresses more than censure or blame, and seems to include the idea of utter rejection; as, to condemn heretical opinions; to condemn ones conduct.


We condemn mistakes with asperity, where we pass over sins with gentleness.


2. To determine or judge to be wrong, or guilty; to disallow; to disapprove.


Beloved, if our heart condemn us not, we have confidence towards God. I John 3.
3. To witness against; to show or prove to be wrong, or guilty, by a contrary practice.


The men of Nineveh shall rise in judgment with this generation, and shall condemn it. Matthew 12.


4. To pronounce to be guilty; to sentence to punishment; to utter sentence against judicially; to doom; opposed to acquit or absolve; with to before the penalty.


The son of man shall be betrayed to the chief priests, and to the scribes, and they shall condemn him to death. Matthew 20.
He that believeth on him is not condemned. John 3.


5. To doom or sentence to pay a fine; to fine.


And the king of Egypt--condemned the land in a hundred talents of silver. 2 Chronicles 36.


6. To judge or pronounce to be unfit for use or service; as, the ship was condemned as not sea-worthy. To judge or pronounce to be forfeited; as, the ship and her cargo were condemned.


Even the Greek words themselves have a variety of meanings. The principal verbs translated as damned and damnation in the King James Bible are krino and katakrino. The noun forms are krima and krisis. They are used in the New Testament in BOTH senses. 1. to condemn to final perdition. and 2. to condemn as being wrong, guilty or inappropriate.


The word damned and damnation occur 14 times in the King James Bible. These words are completely missing from such modern versions as the RSV, ESV, NKJV, NIV, NASB, ISV, NET.


Mark 16:16 - He that believeth and is baptized shall be saved; but he that believeth not shall be damned.  


Romans 14:23 - And he that doubteth is damned if he eat, because he eateth not of faith: for whatsoever is not of faith is sin.

 
2 Thessalonians 2:12 - That they all might be damned who believed not the truth, but had pleasure in unrighteousness.


Matthew 23:14 - Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye devour widows' houses, and for a pretence make long prayer: therefore ye shall receive the greater damnation.  


Matthew 23:33 - Ye serpents, ye generation of vipers, how can ye escape the damnation of hell?  


Mark 3:29 - But he that shall blaspheme against the Holy Ghost hath never forgiveness, but is in danger of eternal damnation: 

 
Mark 12:40 - Which devour widows' houses, and for a pretence make long prayers: these shall receive greater damnation.  


Luke 20:47 - Which devour widows' houses, and for a shew make long prayers: the same shall receive greater damnation. 

 
John 5:29 - And shall come forth; they that have done good, unto the resurrection of life; and they that have done evil, unto the resurrection of damnation.  


Romans 3:8 - And not rather, (as we be slanderously reported, and as some affirm that we say,) Let us do evil, that good may come? whose damnation is just.

 
Romans 13:2 - Whosoever therefore resisteth the power, resisteth the ordinance of God: and they that resist shall receive to themselves damnation.


1 Corinthians 11:29 - For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and drinketh damnation to himself, not discerning the Lord's body.


1 Timothy 5:12 - Having damnation, because they have cast off their first faith.  


2 Peter 2:3 - And through covetousness shall they with feigned words make merchandise of you: whose judgment now of a long time lingereth not, and their damnation slumbereth not.


As can be seen from this list, sometimes the word damnation means the eternal state of perdition for the unrepentant wicked, and at other times it means the state of judgment for being wrong, guilty or inappropriate.


However the newer versions, like the NKJV, NIV, NASB, ESV, that substitute the word "condemned" in these places, still have the same difficulty. Sometimes the word "condemned" means one thing (eternal perdition), and then another (wrong and guilty of inappropriate behavior) - just like the words "damned" and "damnation" do in the King James Bible.


The King James Bible is not alone in translating the word krino as "damnation" when it means merely the state of being guilty, wrong or inappropriate, and does not refer to the eternal state of finally being lost in the lake of fire

In Romans 14:23 we read: "And he that doubteth IS DAMNED if he eat, because he eateth not of faith: for whatsoever is not of faith is sin."


This verse is not speaking of a brother or sister in Christ who is finally lost in hell for eating meat offered to an idol, but rather speaks of a judgment that comes upon their conscience and condemns them as being wrong and guilty of inappropriate behavior.


Other Bible versions that likewise render this word as "DAMNED" are Wycliffe 1395, Tyndale 1525 - "is dampned yf he eate: because he doth it not of fayth.", Coverdale 1535,  The Great Bible (Cranmer) 1540 - "is dampned yf he eate: because he eateth not of fayth.", Bishop's Bible 1568, Douay-Rheims 1582, the Bill Bible 1671, the Clarke N.T. 1795,  Webster's 1833 translation, the Hussey N.T. 1845, The Dillard New Testament 1885,
 The Word of Yah 1993, the KJV 21st Century Version 1994, the Third Millennium Bible of 1998, God's First Truth 1999, The Evidence Bible 2003, Bond Slave Version 2009, Hebraic Transliteration Scripture 2010, The Conservative Bible 2010 - “And he who doubts IS DAMNED if he eats, because he is not eating out of faith. Whatever does not come from faith is sin.”, the New Simplified Bible 2011 - "He that doubts IS DAMNED if he eats, because he eats not by faith. Whatever is not by faith is sin!"


John Gill comments on Romans 14:23


"And he that doubteth,.... Or makes a difference between meats and meats, or is in suspense whether any difference should be observed or not, IS DAMNED; NOT WITH EVERLASTING DAMNATION, which is not the consequent of, nor connected with such an action, as eating of a thing indifferent, with a scrupulous conscience; but such an one is condemned in his own conscience; he is self-condemned, his conscience condemns him for what he himself does; and he is self-condemned in judging and censuring others, for the same things."


B.W. Johnson's People's New Testament commentary says: " He that doubteth is damned if he eat. He is contrasted with him "who has faith". He has not faith, or does not believe that it is right to eat these meats. Hence he is condemned ("damned") by his own conscience. Whatsoever is not of faith is sin. The context shows that Paul means that whenever actions are done by a Christian which he does not believe are right, he sins in doing them. If he is doubtful whether they are right, he must not do them."

1 Corinthians 11:29 - For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and drinketh damnation to himself, not discerning the Lord's body.


Not only does the King James Bible say "drinketh DAMNATION to himself" but so also do Tyndale 1525 - "For he yt eateth or drinketh vnworthely eateth and drynketh his awne damnacion", Coverdale 1535, Cranmer's Bible 1539, Matthew's Bible 1549 - "For he that eateth or drinketh vnworthelye, eateth and drynketh his owne dampnation", the Bishops' Bible 1568, the Geneva Bible 1587 - "eateth and drinketh his owne damnation, because he discerneth not the Lords body.", the Beza New Testament 1599, the Bill Bible 1671, the Clarke N.T. 1795, the Hussey N.T. 1845, The Dillard New Testament 1885, The Word of Yah 1993, the KJV 21st Century Version 1994, the Third Millennium Bible 1998, God's First Truth 1999, Tomson New Testament 2002, The Evidence Bible 2003, Bond Servant Version 2009, Hebraic Transliteration Scripture 2010, and the Knox Bible of 2012 - "he is eating and drinking DAMNATION to himself if he eats and drinks unworthily, not recognizing the Lord’s body for what it is." Knox Bible. Copyright © 2012 Westminster Diocese. Published by Baronius Press.


 Instead of the word "damnation" many modern versions like the NIV, NASB, NKJV, ESV, Darby and others say "condemnation".  And yet they use this same word "condemnation" or "judged" in such passages as John 3:18 "He that believeth on him is not condemned, but he that believeth not is condemned already" (See "condemnation" in NKJV, ESV, NIV and "judged" in NASB, ASV.)


So, as we can see from the various meanings of the word "damned" and "condemned" and even "judged" all three words have different meanings in different contexts. The use of the word "damned" is not wrong or incorrect in the King James Bible (as well as Tyndale, Coverdale, Cranmer, Matthew's, Bishop's, Geneva, Webster's, KJV 21, Simplified Bible 2011, Knox 2012 and Third Millennium Bible 1998), just as the word "condemned" or "judged" is not wrong. Depending on the context, all three words must be explained as having different meanings in English as well as Greek.

 

Will Kinney 

Return to Articles - http://brandplucked.webs.com/kjbarticles.htm