Another King James Bible Believer

Acts 9:5-6 -Is it inspired Scripture?

The King James Holy Bible says: "And he said, Who art thou, Lord? AND THE LORD SAID, I am Jesus whom thou persecutest; IT IS HARD FOR THEE TO KICK AGAINST THE PRICKS. AND HE TREMBLING AND ASTONISHED SAID, LORD, WHAT WILT THOU HAVE ME TO DO? AND THE LORD SAID UNTO HIM, Arise, and go into the city, and it shall be told thee what thou must do."  

 

ESV (NIV, NASB, NET) - "And he said, Who are you, Lord? And he said, I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting. But rise and enter into the city, and you will be told what you are to do."  

 

James Snapp, who is in the process or writing his own bible version that rejects both the Traditional Textus Receptus and the UBS Critical text and even parts of the so called "Majority" text, along with other bible agnostics, tells us: "In Acts 9:5-6 the KJV departs from the Greek manuscripts; this part of the Textus Receptus is retro-translated." 

 

Another more vociferous and ignorant Bible corrector, named William Combs, in his article "Errors in the KJV?", writes - "Another textual error is found in Acts 9:6, where the KJV reads: 

And he trembling and astonished said, Lord, what wilt thou have me to do? And the Lord said unto him, Arise, and go into the city, and it shall be told thee what thou must do. 

The words “And he trembling and astonished said, Lord, what wilt thou have me to do? And the Lord said unto him” (τρεμων τε και θαμβων ειπεν κυριε τι με θελεις ποιησαι και ο κυριος προς αυτον) are not found in any Greek manuscript. They are found in the KJV because they were inserted by Erasmus into his Greek NT (1516), which became the basis for future editions of the TR like the one used by translators of the KJV. Erasmus frankly admitted that he took the words from the parallel passage in Acts 26:14 and inserted them at this point in the Greek text. He did so because they are in the Latin Vulgate at Acts 9:6, and he thought his Greek manuscripts were defective at this point. Unfortunately, Erasmus was wrong. These words have no Greek manuscript support whatsoever, and thus constitute an indisputable error in the KJV.“ [End of William Combs comments]  

First of all, you should know that William Combs does not have any Bible in any language that he can show you that he honestly believes is now or ever was the complete and inerrant words of God. Don't believe me?  Then ask him to show you a copy. He will never do it.  

Secondly, it would be a bit difficult to take the words from Acts 26:14 and put them into Acts 9:6 simply because they are not found in Acts 26:14 and the two passages do not match at all.  

Acts 9:6 reads: "And he trembling and astonished said, Lord, what wilt thou have me to do? And the Lord said unto him, Arise, and go into the city, and it shall be told thee what thou must do."

 

And Acts 26:14 reads: “And when we were all fallen to the earth, I heard a voice speaking unto me, and saying in the Hebrew tongue, Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me? it is hard for thee to kick against the pricks.”

 

The King James Holy Bible says: "And he said, Who art thou, Lord? AND THE LORD SAID, I am Jesus whom thou persecutest; IT IS HARD FOR THEE TO KICK AGAINST THE PRICKS. AND HE TREMBLING AND ASTONISHED SAID, LORD, WHAT WILT THOU HAVE ME TO DO? AND THE LORD SAID UNTO HIM, Arise, and go into the city, and it shall be told thee what thou must do."  

 

The words in capital letters are disputed by the modern versionists. They tell us that these 33 English words do not belong in the New Testament, and are omitted in such versions as the NASB, NIV, RSV, ESV, ISV, NET, the Jehovah Witness New World Translation, most modern Catholic versions and the Holman Standard.

  

They further tell us that Erasmus supposedly got all these extra words from the Latin Vulgate and not from the Greek texts. However there is just "one tiny little problem" with this theory - All these words are NOT found in the Latin Vulgate! 

The Latin Vulgate Jerome consulted in 382 A.D. does not contain these words, nor does the Latin Vulgate of 425 A.D. The Latin Vulgate reads like this in Acts 9:5-7 - 9:5 "qui dixit  quis es Domine et ille ego sum Iesus quem tu persequeris
 9:6 []
9:7 sed surge et ingredere civitatem et dicetur tibi quid te oporteat facere viri autem illi qui comitabantur cum eo stabant stupefacti audientes quidem vocem neminem autem videntes."

You will notice that there IS no verse 6 and all those words are simply absent, just like today's modern Vatican Versions.  Neither are they found in Jerome's Vulgate of 382 A.D.  You can see it here - http://www.drbo.org/lvb/

 Most of the words called into question DO exist in the 1582 Clementine Vulgate, but this was put together in the year 1582, some 75 years AFTER Erasmus compiled his Greek text, so it is more than a little doubtful that Erasmus "used the Vulgate" to give us these words in his Greek text.  You can see the Clementine Vulgate at this site here, but you will notice that it still does not read exactly like the King James Bible because it omits the words "and the Lord said" found in verse 5. 

http://vulsearch.sourceforge.net/html/Act.html 

"5 Qui dixit : Quis es, domine ? Et ille : Ego sum Jesus, quem tu persequeris : durum est tibi contra stimulum calcitrare. 6 Et tremens ac stupens dixit : Domine, quid me vis facere  7 Et Dominus ad eum : Surge, et ingredere civitatem, et ibi dicetur tibi quid te oporteat facere. Viri autem illi qui comitabantur cum eo, stabant stupefacti, audientes quidem vocem, neminem autem videntes.

 

But now the Vatican has come out with The New Vulgate - Nova Vulgata - in 1971 and it omits the words again and follows the Westcott-Hort/UBS/ Nestle-Aland critical Greek texts.  You can see the Nova Vulgata here -

http://www.vatican.va/archive/bible/nova_vulgata/documents/nova-vulgata_novum-testamentum_lt.html 

 

 The first few words: "and the Lord said" are found in the majority of all Greek manuscripts and the Textus Receptus. However Sinaiticus and Vaticanus differ from each other here. Vaticanus omits the verb "said" but it is included in Sinaiticus. The NASB includes the phrase: "and He said", while the NIV omits the phrase altogether, plus it adds "Saul" which is not in any text.

There is also another variant reading found in the manuscripts used to make up the modern versions like the NASB, NIV, RSV, ESV and Holman. Manuscripts A and C add additional words to "I am Jesus" which are not found in Sinaiticus and Vaticanus. These two manuscripts read: "I am Jesus THE NAZARENE", but versions like the NASB, NIV, RSV, ESV do not include "the Nazarene".

So far we see that Sinaiticus differs from Vaticanus, and both differ from the Majority, Alexandrinus, codex C and the Textus Receptus. The NIV does not faithfully follow any manuscript here, but omits even the Sinaiticus-Vaticanus reading, and adds the word Saul to the text.

Regarding the second longer part of this verse - "IT IS HARD FOR THEE TO KICK AGAINST THE PRICKS. AND HE TREMBLING AND ASTONISHED SAID, LORD, WHAT WILT THOU HAVE ME TO DO? AND THE LORD SAID UNTO HIM"

- according to Jack Moorman's book "When the KJV Departs from the "Majority" Text, all these words are found in the Textus Receptus of Erasmus 1516, Stephanus 1550, Beza 1598, Elziver 1624, Greek mss. 629 (14th century), and the Modern Greek New Testament  

 

They are also found in George Ricker Berry's Greek text 1981, J.P Green's Greek interlinear 1976, Interlinear Greek New Testament 1997 (Larry Pierce), the Apostolic Bible Polyglot Greek 2003, Online Interlinear 2010 (André de Mol), Biblos Interlinear Bible 2011 and The Interlinear Hebrew-Greek Scriptures 2012 (Mebust)

 Greek - Modern

http://unbound.biola.edu

5. 

Και ειπε· Τις εισαι, Κυριε; Και ο Κυριος ειπεν· Εγω ειμαι ο Ιησους, τον οποιον συ διωκεις· σκληρον σοι ειναι να λακτιζης προς κεντρα.

6. 

Ο δε τρεμων και εκθαμβος γενομενος, ειπε· Κυριε, τι θελεις να καμω; Και ο Κυριος ειπε προς αυτον· Σηκωθητι και εισελθε εις την πολιν, και θελει σοι λαληθη τι πρεπει να καμης.

 

The entire reading is also found in the Old Latin translation that was done around 150 AD ( ar, c, h, l, p, ph, t), the Clementine Vulgate, one Arabic version, the Ethiopic version, Armenian, Slavonic, and the ancient Georgian version of the 5th century.

According to Mr. Moorman's book, it is also quoted by the church Fathers of Hilary 367, Ambrose 397, Ephraem 373, and Lucifer in 370.  Chrysostom also seems to be familiar with the passage and refers to it in his writings.

Manuscript D is missing the whole section from 8:29 through 10:14, so it is of no help at all in determining the reading. The Greek manuscripts of the uncial E (6th century) and the cursive of 431(12th century) contain all these words as found in the KJB but they are placed at the end of verse 4 instead of in verse 6, and so read the Syriac Peshitta translations of Lamsa 1936 and James Murdock 1858.  

Lamsa's 1933 translation of the Syriac Peshitta says in Acts 9:4 "And he fell to the ground and heard a voice saying to him, Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me? YOU MAKE IT HARD FOR YOURSELF BY KICKING AGAINST THE PRICKS." 

 

Acts 9:5-6 as it stands in the King James Bible is the text of the Reformation Bibles in all languages.

 

Bibles that contain all of Acts 9:5-6

 

Acts 9:5-6 reads the same as the King James Bible in the Wycliffe Bible of 1395 - "And he seide, Who art thou, Lord? And he seide, Y am Jhesu of Nazareth, whom thou pursuest. It is hard to thee, to kike ayens the pricke. 9:6 -And he tremblide, and wondride, and seide, Lord, what wolt thou that Y do?", Tyndale 1534, Coverdale 1535, the Great Bible 1540, Matthew's Bible 1549, the Bishops' Bible 1568, the Geneva Bible 1587 - "And he sayd, Who art thou, Lord? And the Lord sayd, I am Iesus whom thou persecutest: it is hard for thee to kicke against pricks.  He then both trembling and astonied, sayd, Lord, what wilt thou that I doe? And the Lord sayd vnto him, Arise and goe into the citie, and it shall be tolde thee what thou shalt doe." and the Beza New Testament 1599.

 

It also reads this way in the Bill Bible 1671, Mace's N.T. 1729, Whiston's Primitive N.T. 1745, Wesley's N.T. 1755, Worsley Version 1770, Thomas Haweis N.T 1795, the Clarke N.T. 1795, the Thomson Bible 1808, The Revised Translation 1815, The Thomson N.T. 1816, the Wakefield N.T. 1820, Webster's translation of 1833, the Longman Version 1841, the Hammond N.T. 1845, The Morgan N.T. 1848, the Hewett N.T. 1850, The Commonly Received Version 1851, the Julia Smith Translation 1855, the Kenrick N.T. 1862, The Revised New Testament 1862, The Revised English Bible 1877, The Dillard N.T. 1885, The New Dispensation N.T. 1897, Young's 1898, the American Douay-Rheims Bible 1899, New Life Version 1969, the NKJV 1982, the Amplified Bible of 1987, the 21st Century KJV 1994, The Interlinear Greek N.T. 1997 by Larry Pierce, the Third Millennium Bible of 1998, Lawrie Translation 1998, God's First Truth 1999, The Koster Scriptures 1999, The Last Days N.T. 1999, The Tomson N.T. 2002, The Evidence Bible 2003, Green's literal of 2005,  The Resurrection Life N.T. 2005 by Vince Garcia, The Revised Geneva Bible 2005, the Apostolic Bible 2006 by Charles Van der Pool, Bond Slave Version 2009, the English Jubilee Bible 2010, the Hebraic Transliteration Scripture 2010 by Yerusha Shen, the Biblos Interlinear Bible 2011, the Holy Scriptures VW Edition 2010, the Online Interlinear 2010 by André de Mol, the Sacred Scriptures of Yahuwah 2011, the Work of God's Children Illustrated Bible 2011, The Hebraic Roots Bible 2012, the BRG Bible 2012, the Modern Literal Version N.T. 2014 by Allen Walker, and the Modern English Version 2014.

The 2012 Natural Israelite Bible - "And he said, "Who are You, Lord?" Then the Messiah said, "I am Yah’shua, whom you are persecuting. It is hard for you to kick against the goads."

9:6 So he, trembling and astonished, said, "Lord, what do You want me to do?" Then Yah’shua said to him, "Arise and go into the city, and you will be told what you must do."

 

 

Foreign Language Bibles


 

Foreign language Bibles that read like the KJB in Acts 9:5-6 are The Spanish Sagradas Escrituras 1569 as well as Cipriano de Valera 1602 and the Spanish Reina Valeras of 1909, 1960, 1995 and 2011 all contain these words - "9:5 El dijo: ¿Quién eres, Señor? Y le dijo: Yo soy Jesús, a quien tú persigues; dura cosa te es dar coces contra el aguijón.  9:6  El, temblando y temeroso, dijo: Señor, ¿qué quieres que yo haga? Y el Señor le dijo: Levántate y entra en la ciudad, y se te dirá lo que debes hacer."

They are also in the Italian Diodati 1649, the Italian Riveduta of 1927, La Nuova Diodati 1991 and the 2006 Riveduta  - "Egli domandò: «Chi sei, Signore?» E il Signore: «Io sono Gesù, che tu perseguiti. Ti è duro recalcitrare contro il pungolo». 6 Egli, tutto tremante e spaventato, disse: «Signore, che vuoi che io faccia?» Il Signore gli disse: «Àlzati, entra nella città e ti sarà detto ciò che devi fare»." 

So too the Portuguese Almeida Corrigida E Fiel 2009 and Portuguese A Biblia Sagrada - "E ele disse: Quem és, Senhor? E disse o Senhor: Eu sou Jesus, a quem tu persegues. Duro é para ti recalcitrar contra os aguilhöes. 6  E ele, tremendo e atónito, disse: Senhor, que queres que eu faça? E disse-lhe o Senhor: Levanta-te, e entra na cidade, e lá te será dito o que te convém fazer."

 

All the words are found in Luther's German Bible 1545 and the German Schlachter Bible of 2000 - "5. Er aber sagte: Wer bist du, Herr? Der Herr aber sprach: Ich bin Jesus, den du verfolgst. Es wird dir schwer werden, gegen den Stachel auszuschlagen! 6. Da sprach er mit Zittern und Schrecken: Herr, was willst du, dass ich tun soll? Und der Herr antwortete ihm: Steh auf und geh in die Stadt hinein, so wird man dir sagen, was du tun sollst." 

We find all these words in the French Martin 1744, the French Louis Segond 1910 and  the French Ostervald of 1996 - " 9:5. Et il répondit: Qui es-tu, Seigneur? Et le Seigneur lui dit: Je suis Jésus que tu persécutes; il te serait dur de regimber contre les aiguillons. 9:6.  Alors, tout tremblant et effrayé, il dit: Seigneur, que veux-tu que je fasse? Et le Seigneur lui dit: Lève-toi, et entre dans la ville et là on te dira ce que tu dois faire."

They are also included in John Calvin's translation into Latin, the Afrikaans Bible 1953, the Albanian Bible, the Dutch Staten Vertaling version, Czech Bible Kralicka, Hungarian Karoli, Finnish Bible 1776, Latvian N.T. (modern day Slavonic version), Romanian Cornilescu Version and the 2014 Romanian Fidela Bible, the Maori Bible, Russian Synodal Bible, Ukranian, Xhosa Bible 1996 (8 million people in Eastern Cape of Africa), Smith and Van Dyke's Arabic Bible

and Veren's Contemporary Bulgarian Bible 2000 - "И той каза: Кой си Ти, Господи? А Той отговори: Аз съм Иисус, когото ти гониш. Трудно е за теб да риташ срещу остен. 6 И той, треперещ и поразен, каза: Господи, какво искаш да направя? А Господ му каза: Стани и иди в града, и ще ти се каже какво трябва да правиш."

and the Tagalog Ang Salita ng Diyos Bible of 1998  "Sinabi niya: Sino ka ba Panginoon? Sinabi ng Panginoon: Ako si Jesus na iyong pinag-uusig. Mahirap sa iyo ang sumikad sa mga pantaboy na patpat. Nanginginig at nagtatakang sinabi niya: Panginoon, ano ang ibig mong gawin ko? Sinabi ng Panginoon sa kaniya: Tumindig ka at pumunta sa lungsod at sasabihin sa iyo kung ano ang dapat mong gawin."

 

All these words are also in the Modern Greek version and the 2003 Apostolic Bible Polyglot Greek used today  - "Acts 9:5. Και ειπε· Τις εισαι, Κυριε; Και ο Κυριος ειπεν· Εγω ειμαι ο Ιησους, τον οποιον συ διωκεις· σκληρον σοι ειναι να λακτιζης προς κεντρα. Acts 9:6. Ο δε τρεμων και εκθαμβος γενομενος, ειπε· Κυριε, τι θελεις να καμω; Και ο Κυριος ειπε προς αυτον· Σηκωθητι και εισελθε εις την πολιν, και θελει σοι λαληθη τι πρεπει να καμης."

The Modern Hebrew Bible also contains all these words in Acts 9:5-6 -  ויאמר מי אתה אדני ויאמר האדון אנכי ישוע אשר אתה רודף קשה לך לבעט בדרבנות׃    .5
והוא חרד ונבעת ויאמר אדני מה תחפץ ואעשה ויען האדון קום לך העירה ויאמר לך את אשר עליך לעשות׃     .6

 

The Catholic Connection

Among the Catholic versions we see the typical "No reading is sure", constantly changing Bible texts.  The 1582 Douay Rheims contains all these words, (the 1841 English Hexapla clearly shows that all these words were in the Received text - http://bible.zoxt.net/hex/_0736.htm-, as well as the Douay 1950.

But the more modern Catholic versions like St. Joseph NAB 1970 and the New Jerusalem 1985 omitted them, just like the NIV, RSV, ESV, NASB, ISV, NET, Jehovah Witness NWT and Holman Standard.

However, the most recent 2009 Catholic Public Domain Version now puts all these words back in the text! You can see this latest Catholic version here -

http://www.sacredbible.org/catholic/index.htm

 Acts 9:5-6 once again now reads: "And he said, “Who are you, Lord?” And he: “I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting. It is hard for you to kick against the goad.”   And he, trembling and astonished, said, “Lord, what do you want me to do?”


What we have here in Acts 9:5-6 is a cluster of divergent readings found in the remaining Greek copies available to us today and neither the KJB, NIV or NASB all read exactly the same as each other. There are textual differences among the so called "Majority", Sinaiticus, Vaticanus, Alexandrinus, C and D.  None of them agree with each other.

  

Patristic Evidentiary Support for the Genuineness of the above Passage

THE EARLY CHURCH FATHERS 38 VOLUME SET DIGITAL VERSION


Acts 9:5 (KJB)  And he said, Who art thou, Lord? And the Lord said, I am Jesus whom thou persecutest: it is hard for thee to kick against the pricks. 6  And he trembling and astonished said, Lord, what wilt thou have me to do? And the Lord said unto him, Arise, and go into the city, and it shall be told thee what thou must do.

 

   

401 A.D. ST. AUGUSTIN, BISHOP OF HIPPO, THE THREE BOOKS OF AUGUSTIN, BISHOP OF HIPPO IN ANSWER TO THE LETTERS OF PETILIAN, THE DONATIST, BISHOP OF CIRTA BOOK II: CHAP. 20. p 6,519 (44.) PETILIANUS said: "The Lord Christ cries again from heaven to Paul, 'Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me? It is hard for thee to kick against the pricks.'(6) He was then called Saul, that he might afterwards receive his true name in baptism.

 

401 A.D. ST. AUGUSTIN, BISHOP OF HIPPO, THE THREE BOOKS OF AUGUSTIN, BISHOP OF HIPPO IN ANSWER TO THE LETTERS OF PETILIAN, THE DONATIST, BISHOP OF CIRTA BOOK II: CHAP. 21.  p 6,520 (47.) PETILIANUS said: "Accordingly, as we have said, the Lord Christ cried, 'Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me? It is hard for thee to kick against the pricks. And he said, Who art Thou, Lord? And the Lord said, I am Christ of Nazareth, whom thou persecutest. And he, trembling and astonished, said, Lord, what wilt Thou have me to do? And the Lord said unto him, Arise, and go into the city, and it shall be told thee what thou must do.' And so presently it goes on, 'But Saul arose from the earth; and when his eyes were opened, he saw no man,

 

 

347-407 A.D. COMMENTARY OF ST. JOHN CHRYSOSTOM ON THE ACTS OF THE APOSTLES,  HOMILY LII. ACTS XXV. 23. p 9,515 Then he tells, how he persecuted: this also helps the proof: and he brings forward the chief priests as witnesses, and the "strange cities," and that he heard Him saying to him, "It is hard for thee to kick against the pricks," and shows the mercifulness of God, that, though being persecuted He appeared (to men)

 

347-407 A.D. COMMENTARY OF ST. JOHN CHRYSOSTOM ON THE ACTS OF THE APOSTLES,  HOMILY LII. ACTS XXV. 23. p 9, 515 And when we were all fallen to the earth, I heard a voice speaking unto me, and saying in the Hebrew tongue, Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou Me? it is hard for thee to kick against the pricks. And I said, Who art Thou, Lord? And he said, I am Jesus whom thou persecutest;

  

 

296-373 A.D. St. Athanasius,  39. Liberius's speech to Constantius.  p 12,287 persecute not them that believe in Him, lest you also hear the words, 'It is hard for thee to kick against the pricks.'

 


540-604 A.D. THE BOOK OF PASTORAL RULE OF SAINT GREGORY THE GREAT ROMAN PONTIFF TO JOHN BISHOP OF THE CITY OF RAVENNA, PARTS III & IV CHAPTER XXXIV. p 15,177 Hence it is that Saul, when the light from heaven shone upon him, did not hear immediately what he was to do aright, but what he had done wrong. For, when, fallen to the earth, he enquired. saying, Who art Thou, Lord? it was straightway replied, I am Jesus of Nazareth, whom thou persecutest. And when he forthwith replied, Lord, what wilt Thou have me to do? it is added at once, Arise, and go into the city, and it shall be told thee there what thou must do (Acts ix. 4, &c.; xxii. 8, &c.).

 

It is false to make the assumption that the long phrase found in Acts 9:5-6 was brought directly over from Acts 26:14-16, or Acts 22:6-11, because the order of events and words recorded there differ from the account given in Acts 9. Three times Paul relates his conversion experience in the book of Acts, and all three are somewhat different - adding to one account what he leaves out in another. They are found in Acts 9:3-9; Acts 22:6-11, and Acts 26:13-18.

 

In both Acts 9 and Acts 26, the Alexandrian texts differ somewhat from the Textus Receptus, but even following the Greek texts of the TR we can see that the words found in Acts 9 were not taken directly from Acts 26 nor Acts 22.

In Acts 9:4-6 we have: "And he fell to the earth, and heard a voice saying unto him, Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me? And he said, Who art thou, Lord? And [THE LORD SAID,] I am Jesus whom thou persecutest: [IT IS HARD FOR THEE TO KICK AGAINST THE PRICKS. AND HE TREMBLING AND ASTONISHED SAID, LORD, WHAT WILT THOU HAVE ME TO DO. AND THE LORD SAID UNTO HIM]..."

The high lighted portions in brackets are left out of the Jehovah Witness New Word Translation, the NASB, NIV, RSV, ESV, ISV, NET and Holman Standard.

But when we compare the account found in Acts 26:14-15 we see a different set and order of words employed. There we read: "And when [we were all fallen] to the ground, [I heard a voice speaking] unto me, [and] saying in the Hebrew tongue, Saul, Saul, why prsecutest thou me? It is hard for thee to kick against the pricks. And I said, Who art thou, Lord? And [he] said, I am Jesus whom thou persecutest. But rise..."

The words in brackets are either omitted or changed in the texts underlying the NASB, NIV, RSV. Notice the changes from "he fell" to "we were all fallen", "he heard a voice" to "I heard a voice", the word "speaking" is omitted and more importantly, in Acts 9 it is only after Paul asks Who is it?, and the Lord identifies Himself as Jesus, that we read "it is hard for thee to kick against the pricks. And he trembling and astonished said, Lord what wilt thou have me to do?"

However in the Acts 26 account Jesus first tells Paul Who He is and that it is hard for Paul to kick against the pricks, and then Paul asks who it is that is speaking to him. Of great importance is the fact that these debated words which are omitted in the NASB, NIV, RSV - "AND HE TREMBLING AND ASTONISHED SAID, LOR, WHAT WILT THOU HAVE ME TO DO?" - are NOT found there in Acts 26. To assert that they were taken from Acts 26, or Acts 22 and placed in Acts 9 is obviously false, because they do not appear in any texts in Acts 26 or in Acts 22.

In summary, the words in question by many modern versionists are found among a cluster of divergent readings (as if very often the case). They are found in a few remaining Greek manuscripts, many compiled Greek texts (Ten listed), several ancient versions (the Old Latin existed long before Sinaiticus and Vaticanus were penned), quoted by several early church fathers, and are found in many different Bible translations, both old and new, throughout the entire world, including the Modern Greek version  and in the Modern Hebrew Bible.

 

Once again, it comes down to the Traditional Text found in the Reformation Bibles in all languages, versus the every changing modern Vatican Versions like the ESV, NIV, NASB, NET etc. that NOBODY seriously believes are the inerrant words of God. You chose.

Will Kinney

 

For additional information on the reading found in Acts 9:5-6 see the KJV Today article here - 

http://www.kjvtoday.com/home/it-is-hard-for-thee-to-kick-against-the-pricks-and-he-trembling-and-astonished-said-lord-what-wilt-thou-have-me-to-do-and-the-lord-said-unto-him-in-acts-95-6 

Acts 7:20-- "In which time Moses was born, and was EXCEEDING FAIR, and nourished up in his father's house three months."

I am continually amazed at the barrage of silly arguments raised against the authority and accuracy of the King James Bible. As for those who raise objections to the text of the King James Bible, I have yet to find one of them who actually has any Bible version they defend as being the pure, preserved, infallible words of God. Instead, "every man doeth that which is right in his own eyes" and they become their own final authority with a mystical bible that exists only in their own minds.

Such an example of ignorantly trying to "correct" the KJB is found in Acts 7:20. Years ago I was invited to debate the Bible Version issue on the radio. I wish I knew then what I know now, but in any event, one young man called in to say that the King James Bible was wrong when it said Moses was EXCEEDING fair in Acts 7:20. He said it should read as do the NKJV, NASB: "At this time Moses was born, and was well pleasing TO GOD, and he was brought up in his father's house for three months." - (the NKJV), or "was lovely in the sight OF GOD" - (NASB).

Other versions that read like the NKJV, and NASB are Tyndale, the Geneva Bible, the RSV, NRSV, ESV, ISV, Young's, and the Holman Christian Standard.

However there are also many bible translations that read like the King James Bible with "was exceeding fair". Among these are the Revised Version 1881, the American Standard Version 1901, Darby, New American Bible 1970, the Bible in Basic English 1960, Webster's 1833 translation, the KJV 21st Century version 1994, Third Millenium Bible 1998, John Wesley’s translation 1755, Mace’s New Testament 1729, Goodspeed 1943, Weymouth 1913, Rotherham's Emphasized bible 1902, J.B. Phillips translation 1962 - "He was a child of remarkable beauty", the 20th Century New Testament, the Contemporary English Version 1991, the Hebrew Names Bible, the World English Bible,T St. Joseph New American Bible 1970,  Today's English Version 1992,  the New Century Version of 1988 and 2005, God’s Word translation 1995, Worldwide English N.T., Easy to Read Version 2006, the Portugese Ferreira de Almeda Actualizada,-"e era mui formoso",  the Portuguese O Livro of 2000 - "era uma crianca muito bonita", the Spanish Dios Habla Hoy 1996, Biblia en Lenguaje Sencillo 2000,  the Spanish Tracucción en Lenguage Actual 2000 (United Bible Society), La Palabra de Dios Para Todos 2008  - "era un niño muy hermoso", the Italian La Parola e Vita 1997, - "un bambino straordinariamente bello",  the French Martin 1744, the Updated Bible Version 2004 and The Message of 2002 - "a most beautiful baby".

The NIV and the TNIV are a bit unusual in that they both say Moses "was no ordinary child", but like the KJB, they do not contain the words "of God" in their translation.

There is a simple and thoroughly biblical explanation as to why the KJB and many others translated this phrase as "exceeding fair" instead of "lovely to God". The Greek reads the same here in all texts (και ην αστειος τω θεω) so it is not a textual but rather a translational issue.

Some of the meanings of the word "God" or Elohim in Hebrew and God or Theos in Greek are "mighty, very great, exceeding, or judges". ALL bible versions at times translate Elohim as "great, mighty, or exceeding". The NIV, for example, shows the word Elohim as translated in the following manner: "God, angels, godly, idols, majestic, sacred, MIGHTY, GREAT, and VERY." The NASB also lists "God, mighty, great, judges, and rulers."

Notice how the post-Christian Greek Septuagint version renders these verses from the Old Testament, and how they employ the word "God, or Theos".

Jonah 3:3 "Now Nineveh was and EXCEEDING great city of three days' journey" - h de nineuh hn polis megalh tw thew.

Genesis 23:6 "Hear us, my lord: thou art a MIGHTY prince among us" - basileus para theou ei su en hmin

Genesis 30:8 "And Rachel said, With GREAT wrestlings have I wrestled with my sister, and I have prevailed." - kai eipen rachl sunelabeto moi o theos

Exodus 9:28 "Intreat the LORD (for it is enough) that there be no more MIGHTY thunderings and hail" -fwnas theou kai calazan

1 Samuel 14:15 "and the earth quaked: so it was a very GREAT trembling"- egenhqh ekstasis para kuriou

The King James Bible is NOT incorrect in Acts 7:20 by saying Moses was "exceeding fair". In fact, it makes more sense and is consistent with what we are told in Exodus 2:2. "And the woman conceived, and bare a son: and when she saw him that he was a goodly child, she hid him three months." That he was a goodly child simply means that Moses was a beautiful baby, and that is exactly what we are told again in Acts 7:20. To say, as the NKJV and NASB do, that this little baby boy of only a few weeks old was "well pleasing to God" when all he could do was cry, wiggle, eat and poop his diapers is to attribute a spiritual life to him that babies simply do not have.

Will Kinney

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